Awards and Accolades

AGTA Cutting Edge Award for Faceting, 2011

Jeff steps forward to be recognized at the 2011 AGTA Spectrum Awards Gala in Tucson, Arizona. To the right of Jeff are fellow faceters and award winners Ben Kho and John Dyer.

There are a number of gem cutting competitions held annually around the world. Some judge technical skill (cutting precision, polish quality, etc.), others are based purely on aesthetics of the finished gem, and still others are a blend of the two.

J.L. White Fine Gemstones began competing nationally in 2008, when Jeff first entered the United States Faceters Guild Single Stone Competition. Since that time, we are honored to have had success in competitions on both the technical and artistic ends of the spectrum.

Below you will find information on some of the awards we have been honored to receive in recent years.

 

Morganite

1st Place: 2011 AGTA Cutting Edge Awards, Faceting Division

There is no greater honor in the gem and jewelry industry than to win an American Gem Trade Association (AGTA) Spectrum or Cutting Edge Award.

"In 1991, the AGTA created the Cutting Edge Awards to honor creativity in lapidary arts, including faceted gems and pearls, carvings, and objects of art. It is a true contest of workmanship, creativity and innovation. Winners set the standards of excellence for our entire industry... The Spectrum Awards is considered the finest jewelry and gemstone competition in the world" (taken from the 2011 AGTA Spectrum Awards press release)

Jeff's winning gemstone was the 48.83 ct. flawless morganite at left, cut in a unique design created specifically for the competition.

Pink Spinel

2nd Place: 2011 Gemmy Competition, Faceting Division

Until recently, Lapidary Journal Jewelry Artist and Colored Stone Magazines sponsored a gem cutting competition called "The Gemmys." It was open to all gem cutters around the world. Awards were given in 5 categories: traditional (flat) faceting, specialty cut gems, cabochons, gem objects, and "Artists on the Horizon," with judging based on the overall aesthetics of the piece.

In the 2011 competition, Jeff White placed second with this flawless pink spinel. 2011 was the final year for the Gemmys competition, which has since been discontinued by the publishers of Lapidary Journal Jewelry Artist.

1st Place: 2009 USFG Single Stone Competition, Grand Master Class

Each year, The United States Faceters Guild holds a cutting competition, open to all members world-wide. This "Single Stone Competition" focuses purely on the technical aspects of faceting. All participants in a particular class are given the same design to cut. It is to be cut to the same diameter and must adhere to very strict tolerances. Entries are judged based upon adherence to the design, accuracy of facet meet points, flatness of facets, defects (scratches, pitting, etc.), and quality of polish. Each stone is judged against a theoretically-perfect stone, which would receive 100 points.

Jeff tied for first in Grand Master Class (USFG's highest classification) with a score of 98.9005 out of a possible 100 points. The Master and Grand Master Class cut for this year was the 80-facet "Superpear," which Jeff cut in clear quartz.

Peridot

2nd Place: 2009 Gemmy Competition, Faceting Division

Until recently, Lapidary Journal Jewelry Artist and Colored Stone Magazines sponsored a gem cutting competition called "The Gemmys." It was open to all gem cutters around the world. Awards were given in 5 categories: traditional (flat) faceting, specialty cut gems, cabochons, gem objects, and "Artists on the Horizon," with judging based on the overall aesthetics of the piece.

In the 2009 competition, Jeff White placed second with the 4.29 ct. Pakistani peridot pictured to the left. The January issue of Lapidary Journal Jewelry Artist and the 2009 Colored Stone Tucson Show Guide featured the award recipients.

3rd Place: 2008 USFG Single Stone Competition, Master Class

Each year, The United States Faceters Guild holds a cutting competition, open to all members world-wide. This "Single Stone Competition" focuses purely on the technical aspects of faceting. All participants in a particular class are given the same design to cut. It is to be cut to the same diameter and must adhere to very strict tolerances. Entries are judged based upon adherence to the design, accuracy of facet meet points, flatness of facets, defects (scratches, pitting, etc.), and quality of polish. Each stone is judged against a theoretically-perfect stone, which would receive 100 points.

Jeff placed 3rd among all entrants in the 2008 Master Class Competition, with a score of 99.0979 out of a possible 100 points. The Master Class cut for this year was the 97 facet "Gamma Brilliant," which Jeff cut in synthetic sapphire.